Heard in Europe

A Bulgarian painter informs Heard in Europe he was warned nude paintings could not be exposed to the European Parliament, so he over-painted bras and slips to mask the private parts of his male and female figures.
Valchan Petrov, a famous Bulgarian painter, told Nova TV on Thursday (14 May) that a commission tasked to prepare an exhibition of his works to the European Parliament has asked him to “dress” all the female breasts and other female and male private parts in his paintings.
“I got a call from a colleague in charge of the cultural policy of the European Parliament in Luxembourg. But 3 or 4 days before I was going to send the painting by a courier company, however, I was urgently ordered to “dress” all tits and various other sexual attributes,” said the artist in the televised interview.
According to the artist the order came from the committee that reviewed the paintings, which decided such nudity could not be exposed. The artist did not callValchan Petrov2 off the exhibition because in his words “thousands” had been already invested in transporting the paintings.
So he thought of using a glue of flour and pasting painted napkins to mask the private parts of his figures.
But once the works arrived in the European Parliament, one of the persons in charge of the exhibition noticed part of a tissue “bra” had come unstuck. Petrov said he re-affixed its modesty using a piece of chewing gum.
Petrov says he was not offended by the censorship and that he even enjoyed the experience.
On Thursday Heard in Europe asked the European Parliament to comment on the TV report. We were told that the relevant people were on holiday and a first reaction could not be expected before Monday (20 May).
Naturally the Taliban do not work Fridays.

Photo: Courtesy of Flickr/Arctic Warrior

 

 

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  1. “We were told that the relevant people were on holiday and a first reaction could not be expected before Monday (20 May).”
    Does this explain why the Commission is behind the curve in addressing the question of the Muslim invasion spreading across the Mediterranean.

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